OPTF

Data Privacy

Cyber laws around the world: Privacy is not the policy

There is no doubt that the European Union’s GDPR has changed the cyber regulation landscape forever. As onlookers from non-EU countries urge their governments and regulators to adopt similar legislation, countries are rapidly adopting their own sweeping data protection and cyber legislation, much of which is below the standards required to genuinely protect the rights …

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The long and winding road : Striving for data protection in Indonesia

Juliana Harsianti is an independent researcher and journalist working at the intersection of digital technology and social impact. The long awaited Indonesian Personal Data Protection Bill was approved by the parliament on 20 September 2022. Despite the initial draft being submitted to parliament in 2016, this long-pending legislation experienced delays due to disagreements between Government, …

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Recognition and Protection: India’s Data Privacy Journey

Amber is a Senior Fellow-Trustworthy AI at Mozilla Foundation studying models for algorithmic transparency. He works at the intersection of law, technology and society. The Indian Government withdrew the Personal Data Protection Bill in August 2022, indicating it would work on a new bill soon. The legislative process towards data protection laws in India has …

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Signal, mobile numbers and the Twilio hack

The recent Twilio hack raises important questions about the vulnerability SMS-based verifications – where users receive an SMS with special code to verify or confirm that they have access to a mobile number used to register to a service. In OPTF’s latest Framed newsletter, we explore the Twilio hack and the vulnerability of using SMS …

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The anonymity argument: Debunking the real name fallacy

Originally published on Session. When the internet began, anonymity (or really, pseudonymity) was built into the experience. For the first time in history, we had mass-scale pseudonymous connection and communication. People were posting on bulletin boards, messaging on mailing lists, and working every day with people that they didn’t really know. It didn’t take long for questions …

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On the recent Australian surveillance legislation

Originally published on Session. Regulators are increasingly acting with open hostility towards encryption, security, and privacy. The latest chapter in this sorry story took  place in our own backyard when Australia’s government passed a new bill granting the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) new surveillance capabilities. Because Session is built in …

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Privacy propaganda: The war on encryption

Originally published on Session. Encryption doesn’t mean encryption. Encryption is a code word that stands for freedom of speech, the free press, and the preservation of the human rights we all hold dear. Encryption is a weapon that’s pointed directly at the biggest, most concentrated powers in the world; encryption makes those in power accountable …

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